Wildlife Viewing
Lake State Examples - Other Examples         
Back to Table of Contents                                                                                                   

Lake States Examples:

Marcouiller, D. W., J. Preissing and J. Alpi. 1995. Regional Economic Impact of the Crex Meadows Wildlife Area: Assessment of a Proposed Wildlife Education Center Expansion. Madison, WI: Tourism Research and Resources Center, University of Wisconsin-Extension.

This study applied characteristic expenditure patterns to a regional input-output model (constructed using MicroIMPLAN) to estimate the economic impacts associated with an expanded visitor center at the Crex Meadows Wildlife Refuge, located in Burnett County, Wisconsin. A useful comparison of previous expenditure studies is presented in tabular form. Average daily trip-related expenditures identified in a recent study of eagle watchers on the Wisconsin River was applied to the current and projected annual visits to the Crex Meadows Wildlife Area in Burnett County. Results suggest that current visitors spend approximately $2.4 million annually. The potential exists, with expansion, to increase this by $355,000 annually. When applied to an input-output model of Burnett County, these expenditures translate into economic impact measured by income generated and jobs created.

Van Koningsveld, R., W. C. Norman, D. W. Marcouiller and G. Wise. 1994. Eagle Watchers Along the Wisconsin River: Survey Results From the Winter of 1993-1994. Madison, Tourism Research and Resources Center, University of Wisconsin-Extension.

During the winter of 1993/1994, the authors conducted a visitor survey in the Prairie du Sac/ Sauk City area to identify marketing information and expenditure patterns concerning eagle watching. Most of the parties observing eagles were from Madison and Milwaukee. About 10,000 visitor parties came to the area during the eagle watching season. Total expenditures by these visitors was estimated at about $600,000.

Other Examples:

Eubanks, T. L. J., R. B. Ditton and J. R. Stoll. 1998. Platte River Nature Recreation Study. Austin, TX: Texas. Web Link.

This study uses willingness to pay to calculate the value of bird watching only the Platte River in Nebraska. A total of 1,259 surveys were collected and a random telephone check of non-respondents revealed no response-basis. Respondents indicated a willingness to pay an additional $192.75 annually before they would have cancelled their trips to and within the Middle Platte. The consumer surplus for bird watching ranged between $2.8 million and $4.4 million and the total value of wildlife watching along the Platte River ranged between $27.9 million and $57.5 million.

United States Department of the Interior. 1993. 1991 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife Associated Recreation - Wisconsin. U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Services.

The Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Interior had the U.S. Bureau of the Census to conduct a two-phased survey for a national count of fishermen and hunters and non-consumptive users of wildlife. This report represented the Wisconsin sample. In the first phase, households were sampled by phone to determine who had partook in wildlife activities. From this information, the second phase was conducted which consisted of interviews with sub-samples of fishermen, hunters, and others. This report provided detailed information such as trip-related expenditures, expenditures for wildlife-associated recreation, and residential and non-residential participants.

United States Department of the Interior. 1988. 1985 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife Associated Recreation. U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Services.

The Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Interior had the U.S. Bureau of the Census to conduct a two-phased survey for a national count of fishermen and hunters and non-consumptive users of wildlife. In the first phase, households were sampled by phone to determine who had partook in wildlife activities. From this information, the second phase was conducted which consisted of interviews with sub-samples of fishermen, hunters, and others. This report provided detailed information from this census.

Back to Table of Contents